There’s no skirting the issue:  us ladies at TBF are always hot on the heels of an amazing deal, ready to scarf up everything that’ll make us look cute as a button.  Hey, wait a minute, is it me or are there a lot of clothing-related phrases going on here?  Buttons, skirts, heels . . . hmmm.  Just for kicks, we decided to get the scoop on the origin of some common fashion idioms and phrases.  Here’s the lowdown.

What Some Fashion Idioms Mean

Skirt the Issue

Wow, some of this word origin stuff gets heavy (Viking invasions and the Old Norse language).  Whew.  Bottom line: “skirt” started showing up in English around 1300 (very pre-Target), a time when village borders were referred to as the “outskirts.”  People sometimes traveled these outskirts instead of passing directly through a city to avoid awkward or troublesome situations (kind of like how I drive just to avoid craziness in certain parking lots).  Such serious info, right?  Hey, I just like to say, “I’’m not going to skirt the issue—I love a good deal.”  Check out some cool skirts below:

Picture 1 of 3

ASOS Pencil Skirt in Rose and Lace Print

Pencil Skirt in Rose and Lace Print, $31.66 from ASOS

Hot on the Heels 

Anyone who knows me is well aware that I’m a sucker for heels.  Next time I slip my sole into a Bandolino pump though, I’ll be thinking of that game where people make each other guess the location of something with “you’re getting warmer . . . hot” clues.   However, zeroing in on something has do with (turn your eyes away, vegetarians) a hunting reference where hounds are literally on the heels of their prey, in hot pursuit of dinner (which also evolved to the “getting warmer” phrase in the find-the-object game).  Wow, who knew?  All I know is that I’m hot on the heels of these lovelies:

Picture 4 of 4

Bandolino Capture

Bandolino Capture, $52.99 at Zappos