How to Do Your Own Pedicure

TBFers, can we chat?

The weather is getting warmer, which means it’s time to break out the sandals. And while we encourage you to rock your favorite pair of shoes (no one loves a good pair of sandals more than u), we also encourage you to please, please, take care of your feet. Nothing ruins an awesome pair of sandals more than crusty feet.

Now we’re not suggesting you run out and spend $100 on a deluxe pedicure, especially when you can do your own pedicure at home for a fraction of the cost. So, take care of your feet with our step by step instructions for an at home pedicure after the jump.



How to Do Your Own Pedicure

What you’ll need:
A big, fluffy bath towel
A large bowl or pot ((big enough to fit your feet)
Aromatic candles (try: Apple Cider Sweet Chunx candles)
Nail clippers & file
Cotton Balls
Nail polish remover
Pumice stone
Peppermint foot lotion ( try: The Body Shop Peppermint Foot Lotion)

1) Set the Vibe

Gather all your pedicure tools and organize them on a coffee table next to a comfortable chair. Fill the large bowl with hot water and place the bowl in front of your chair. Dim the lights or turn them off completely and get ready to work by candlelight.

2) Soak and Soothe

Remove old nail polish and then clip and file nails. Pour a sweet smelling oil or gel into the water, which should be warm by now. Soak your feet in the bowl of water for 10-15 minutes. Make sure to take them out before they prune up!  Use the pumice stone periodically to help shed your dry “winter” skin.

** Depending on the degree of roughness, you might need to repeat these steps to get your feet in flip flop shape.

3) Treat Your Feet
Pat your feet dry and using the nail file smooth any rough edges that you missed before soaking. Apply peppermint lotion. Use cotton balls to separate your toets. Apply base coat, top coat, prop your feet on the table, put a good DVD in and relax, relax, relax

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Comments

  1. Jennifer says

    It’s good to know that you can have beautiful feet on a budget. When I did my pedicure I did a little twist I used clothing detergent, it soften’s your feet a lot. My pedicure was good but I just can’t seem to paint my toe nails.

  2. says

    If you have diabetes, it’s important to practice good foot care all year long, and if possible, have your pedicures done by a podiatrist. Also, don’t use hot water to soak your feet, just warm. Make sure to wipe your feet off until they’re completely dry, and use an emollient lotion preferably formulated just for feet to soften and gently exfoliate your feet. Flexitol is a good one. Let the lotion sink in, THEN start applying your nail polish.

    Also, a good way to get a natural exfoliation done on your feet is to go walking in wet sand on the beach – gets all the rough spots smooth. Wash off your feet at the fountain provided for that purpose (most public beaches have them, either in the bathroom or on the boardwalk) and give yourself a nice pedicure when you get home.

    Good tips, TBF!

  3. sandy says

    I agree with Jennifer; it’s something that goes wrong with painting toe nails. Like my hands, I can do one side well but then the other side is difficult. And if you’re on the heavy side and can’t quite reach over(I know…lose some weight) it is difficult. But I don’t think you necessarily have to go for a pedicure, but just need some minor tips on how to get the baby toe done. In what order should you work?
    One thing, I’ll throw this out here, is that I use in between the toe sandals particularly for painting my toe nails so that if I make a mistake it doesn’t get on the floor. The other thing I do is: use the in between the toes separators.
    I also try to wear sandals that don’t show the last two toes as much since those are the hardest to paint.
    When I get real desperate, I just paint them badly and then clean up the paint around the nail with nail polish remover and a q-tip.
    Any other tips on this forum will be appreciated.

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