Fueled by a recent down turn in sales, Old Navy Old Navy Gets a New Outlook on Style is getting both a new head and a new outlook on style. According to the San Francisco Business Times, the store is planning to go back to its style for less roots.

Now, I’ve shopped at Old Navy Old Navy Gets a New Outlook on Style since the beginning and I remember it always focused on the basics—head into an Old Navy Old Navy Gets a New Outlook on Style anywhere in the country and you know you can find a pair of jeans for $29 and perfect fit tees in a bazillion colors, for 2 for $18. That was the beauty of Old Navy. 

If anything, I think the stores, at least in the New Jersey/New York/CT area have become way too trendy.  I know the store pulls from the same demographics as H&M and Forever 21, but unlike these stores Old Navy Old Navy Gets a New Outlook on Style also pulls from the same demographics as Talbots and Lane Bryant. No wonder Old Navy Old Navy Gets a New Outlook on Style has lost many of its customers to Target, a company who gets how to be trendy and basic at the same time.

I don’t want my Old Navy Old Navy Gets a New Outlook on Style trendy—that’s what I have H&M and F21 for. I appreciate some of the fun additions to their fall collection. However, don’t leave out the basics.  I want my Old Navy Old Navy Gets a New Outlook on Style full of jeans—of all possible designs, cuts, and sizes. I want huge, towering displays of perfect fit t-shirts that are 2 for $15. I want the cheesy ads that help pad the retirement funds of old 80’s tv stars like the late Wheezy Jefferson. Carrie Donovan, the celebrated, black framed glasses wearing fashion editor for Vogue, Bazaar and The New York Times Magazine. Having these icons pitch $29 jeans was as inspired of a fashion commercial as fashion commercials get. 

Old Navy execs, keep Old Navy Old Navy Gets a New Outlook on Style basic—but fun.  Even us trend loving people, like a good basic white t-shirt.

         
budgetfashionista

Target.com