Cost Per Wear & 70/30The Two KEY Shopping Formulas You Should Know

Shopping isn’t just about buying cutesy $15 t-shirts that end up collecting dust in our closets, but about choosing quality merchandise. I’ve gathered my best formulas, that I created after year of closet mishaps, to help you save money (and save your closets).

Follow the 70/30 Rule

We love trends and think every Stylista should certainly have fun pieces in her closest, but these pieces shouldn’t dominate the closets. When budget shopping the value and usefulness of your potential goods needs to be your primary concern. Use the 70/30 rule use my 70/30 rule to help you keep an established closet:

70/30 Rule: 70 percent of your closet should include timeless pieces that never go out of style. These are your classic staples, like a great pair of jeans, that you’ll keep for a long time and will form the base of your wardrobe. The other 30% of your closest can include trendy pieces like a sequined jacket or brightly colored tights. These are pieces you will mostly like recycle out of your closet after a season or two. You SHOULD NOT spend a ton of money on these items.

Remember the Cost Per Wear Formula

The Cost Per Wear Formula cost per wear, which I developed in 2004, helps you focus on the value, not just the price, of an item.

The Cost Per Wear Formula: Total cost of the item/ estimated length of time you’ll wear it

Here’s How it Works:

Buy:
Let’s say you go into Forever 21 and buy a shirt on sale for 15 bucks — its cute and floral and at that price you don’t think twice about it. Well, it turns out you never wear this shirt.

Value:
You have another top, a $60 sweater from J Crew, nothing special except you have had it for two years and wore it over 20 times.

The Formula:
According to the cost per wear formula: the actual price of that Forever 21 shirt cost you is $15 since you never wore it. Whereas the actual cost of the J Crew sweater is $2 bucks, and it gets cheaper and cheaper after every use.